Courses

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  • SECU 600- National Security (3 credit hours)
    This course provides students with a broad perspective of National Security. It lays the foundation for one of the three key areas in the field of Professional Security Studies,
    focusing on the importance and impact that National Security has on the public and corporate America.

    SECU 605- Corporate Security (3 credit hours)
    This course exposes students to a systematic approach used to monitor low-probability, high-impact events that could adversely impact a company’s strategic plans and/or tactical execution. Students will examine the traditional and alternative approaches to the indications and warning process, to include effective security planning and implementation.

    SECU 610- Cyber Security (3 credit hours)
    This course provides an overview of cyber security. It exposes the dimensions of our network, information-based society; reviews the impact of information security on institutions, privacy, business and government risks; the development of legislation; and examines the dimensions of networks, protocols, operating systems and associated applications.

    SECU 615-Research Methods I (3 credit hours)
    Research Methods is an introduction to the use of primary sources, including the review of various methodologies and techniques of research design. Students will gain experience in the development of research proposals and in the use and verification of different types of empirical evidence.

    SECU 620-Research Methods II (3 credit hours)
    This course is a continuation of Research Methods I (Sec 615). Students will be exposed to inferential statistical methodology, which they can incorporate into their research design. Pre-requisite: SECU 615-Research Methods I.

    SECU 625- Counterintelligence (3 credits hours)
    This course provides an overview of the history and evolution of counterintelligence, covering areas that include passive and active measures, principles and processes, ethics, and evaluation of successes and failures. Students will develop a comprehensive knowledge of uses and practices of counterintelligence with respect to homeland and national security interests.

    SECU 630- Domestic Terrorism and Extremist Groups (3 credit hours)
    This course traces the history, emergence, and growth of paramilitary, hate and terrorist groups within the United States. Students will assess the motivations of various groups, their capabilities, and activities within the context of security issues, political activism and the law.

    SECU 635- Contemporary Counterterrorism (3 credit hours)
    This course examines the evolution of intelligence and counterterrorism while analyzing U.S. and international policies for combating terrorism, terrorist tactics worldwide, and the scope of terrorism in the twenty-first century. Terrorism and national security, political solutions, and alternatives to current counterterrorism policy will also be examined.

    SECU 640- Critical Incident Command and Response (3 credit hours)
    This course outlines for practitioners the management of critical incidents. Students explore issues relating to the on-scene command structure, emergency command center, or field command post. It also reviews the responsibilities of the Incident Commander, as case scenarios are developed and a command structure is implemented, overseeing an entire operation.

    SECU 645- Corporate Threat Definition and Vulnerability Analysis (3 credit hours)
    This course defines the full spectrum of threats to a corporate structure, evaluating the capabilities in place to address the threat, and most importantly, for identifying vulnerabilities. Students will learn processes to conduct surveys and assessments related to corporate threats posed by political, societal, and economic unrest.

    SECU 650- Organizational Crisis Management (3 credit hours)
    This course examines Organizational Crisis Management. The importance to an organization of having a crisis management plan is emphasized, as well as planning for crises, developing levels of preparation, identifying factors that need to be managed, forecasting potential crisis situations, and examining key elements of a crisis management plan. Pre-requisite: SECU 640- Critical Incident Command and Response

    SECU 655- Topics in Computer Security (3 credit hours)
    Content varies depending on faculty interests, research developments, and student demand, as current topics of advanced research in computer security are examined. Representative topics include but are not limited to formal models for computer security, multilevel data models, multilevel database management system architectures, etc.

    SECU 660- Security and Privacy of Information and Information Systems (3 credit hours)
    Students will develop knowledge and skills for security of information and information systems. This course examines concepts and auditing security at all levels and systems platforms; presents techniques for assessing risk associated with accidental and intentional breeches of security; and studies associated issues of ethics of information and privacy considerations.

    SECU 665- Information Security Strategy and Policy Development (3 credit hours)
    Policy, planning and implementation in building a comprehensive information risk management program is examined. Students will develop knowledge of hacking and weaknesses exploited; an overview of the legal framework of network security; formulation of site security policy; countermeasures to secure computers; and integrating security components into an organizational program.

    SECU 670- Thesis I (3 Credits):
    This course represents a student’s initial thesis enrollment. The objective of this course is to guide students towards the successful completion of a thesis proposal that will enable them to complete their study. Prerequisite: Completion of course work.

    SECU 675- Thesis II (3 Credits):
    This course represents a student’s continuing thesis enrollment. The student continues to enroll in this course until the proposal is developed and either near completion, if not completed, and approved by the thesis committee. Prerequisite: Completion of Thesis I (SECU 670)

    SECU 680- Specialized Field Project: Security Studies (6 credit hours)
    This course provides an opportunity for students to choose a specialized field research project in lieu of a thesis or comprehensive exam. Students must complete 24 credits of study before applying. Participation must be approved by the Dean of the College of Professional Studies and a faculty committee. 

     SECU 810 Current Issues in Civil Security Leadership, Management and Policy (3 credit hours)
    This doctoral-level course provides students with a broad perspective of current aspects of effective civil security management: National, Corporate and Information Assurance/Cyber Security. The two focus areas in Part I are security principles and practices and business principles and practices.

    SECU 815 Current Issues in Civil Security Leadership, Management and Policy (3 credit hours) Co-requisite: SECU 810
    This doctoral-level course provides students with a broad perspective of current aspects of effective civil security management: National, Corporate and Information Assurance/Cyber Security. The five key focus areas in Part II are: 1) personnel security, 2) physical security, 3) emergency practices, 4) investigations and 5) legal aspects.

    SECU 820 Data Analysis for Civil Security Leadership, Management and Policy I (3 credit hours)
    This course examines the approaches of doctoral-level social science inquiry, including experiments, surveys, and qualitative field methods. It is intended to immerse doctoral students into ways of conceptualizing problems, designing research, collecting data, and interpreting those data beyond their master level degree experiences.

    SECU 825 Data Analysis for Civil Security Leadership, Management and Policy II (3 credit hours) Co-requisite: SECU 820
    Statistical and advanced data analysis techniques used by professional security researchers are examined: concepts of probability, normal and related statistical distributions; statistical inference; hypothesis testing; properties of estimators, distribution-free (non-parametric) tests; the general linear model; simple and multiple regression analysis; and one- and two-way analysis of variance.

    SECU 830 Doctoral Seminar in Emergency Management and Operations I (3 credit hours)
    This is a doctoral-level colloquium that synthesizes the continuum between planned and improvised behavior in emergency operations. It emphasizes tools and techniques useful for comprehending and supporting decision-making in emergencies, and enables learners to apply them in simulated and actual emergency responses. Practitioners will interact with the students.

    SECU 835 Doctoral Seminar in Emergency Management and Operations II (3 credit hours) Co-requisite: SECU 830
    This is a doctoral-level colloquium that synthesizes the continuum between planned and improvised behavior in emergency management. It emphasizes tools and techniques useful for planning and managing emergencies. Proactive risk mitigation efforts are explored by students to create world-class emergency plans for urban Civil Security organizations.

    SECU 840 Communications for Civil Security Leadership, Management and Policy I (3 credit hours)
    This doctoral course presents an overview of the principles and practices of executive-level communications in a modern society. It examines internal and external forms of communication for maximizing Civil Security information dissemination. Practice presentations, discussions, and collaborations are modeled in the course and throughout the doctoral program.

    SECU 845 Communications for Civil Security Leadership, Management and Policy II (3 credit hours) Co-requisite: SECU 840
    This doctoral course explores how to create and implement executive-level communication plans that provide outreach to an organization's key stakeholders and how to evaluate the effectiveness of those plans. The communications knowledge base contains the underpinning for the Civil Security field. All course activities are Civil Security-centric.

    SECU 850 Civil Security Policy and Budget Development and Implementation I (3 credit hours)
    This course covers policy concepts that concern executive-level Civil security practitioners: National, Corporate and Information Assurance/Cyber Security. The course will consider policy; the policy process and players; individual policies which influence security around the world; and the role of Civil security leaders in policy development.

    SECU 855 Civil Security Policy and Budget Development and Implementation II (3 credit hours) Co-requisite: SECU 850
    This course continues the special emphasis placed on budget development and implementation in support of policies. The course will build on the knowledge, comprehension and application of policy and budget techniques used by security professionals. Emphasis is placed on risk management and mitigation in urban settings.

    SECU 860 Dissertation Proposal I (3 credit hours) In this course doctoral students will be guided and assisted in the development of their dissertation proposals in one of the three domains of security: National, Corporate and Information Assurance/Cyber Security. Candidates will develop and refine their hypothesis, and research contemporary related literature.

    SECU 865 Dissertation Proposal II (3 credit hours) Co-requisite: SECU 860
    In this course doctoral students will be guided in the development of their dissertation proposals in one of the three domains of security: National, Corporate and Information Assurance/Cyber Security. Candidates will continue their proposal, and explain in detail their research methodology, as well as design, and data collection instruments.

    SECU 900 Dissertation Seminar I (3 credit hours)
    This doctoral seminar will focus on resolving dissertation issues and problems in preparation for SECU 910 – Dissertation Proposal II, within one of the three domains of security: National, Corporate and Information Assurance/Cyber Security. In a classroom environment, doctoral students develop, present and modify their doctoral dissertation manuscripts.

    SECU 910 Dissertation Seminar II (3 credit hours) Co-requisite: SECU 900
    This doctoral seminar will focus on resolving dissertation issues and problems in preparation for SECU 950 – Dissertation Advisement, within one of the three domains of security: National, Corporate and Information Assurance/Cyber Security. In a classroom environment, doctoral students develop, present and modify their doctoral dissertation manuscripts.

    SECU 950 Dissertation Advisement (3 credit hours)
    In this course doctoral students will work individually with their Dissertation Mentor and committee members on the completion of their dissertation. To be acceptable, the dissertation must be evidence that the student has pursued a program of research, the results of which reveal superior academic competence and a significant contribution of knowledge to the field of professional security leadership, management and policy within one of the three domains of security: National, Corporate and Information Assurance/Cyber Security. The final component is to orally defend the dissertation before the Dissertation Mentor and committee members. Emphasis is placed on risk management and mitigation in urban settings.

    SECU 960 Oral Defense (3 credit hours) Co-requisite: SECU 950
    In this course doctoral students will work individually with their Dissertation Mentor and committee members on the oral defense of their dissertation within one of the three domains of security: National, Corporate and Information Assurance/Cyber Security. Emphasis is placed on risk management and mitigation in urban settings.

    SECU 970 Continuation of Dissertation Completion and Defense (3 semester hours – non-degree credits; repeatable)
    The purpose of this course is to allow student to continue and complete their doctoral degree within the seven year time limit. Emphasis is continued on risk management and mitigation in urban settings. Grading is P for satisfactory progress, F for unsatisfactory progress or IN for incomplete (can be carried for up to six weeks into the following term, then reverts to F).